penis enlargement

Long-Term Effects of Dihydrotestosterone on Prostate Growth

November 29, 2010

prostateThe effects of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on prostate growth are not yet completely understood, and research is on-going. Short-term studies using transdermal Andractim DHT gel have indicated that DHT could prevent prostate growth and may be beneficial to overall prostate health.

Long-term results seem to tell a different story however. In a new study published November 16 in the Annals of Internal Medicine, researchers confirmed that 2 years of treatment with DHT gel showed no benefit over placebo at reducing prostatic growth.

Background: Benign prostatic hypertrophy increases with age and can result in substantially decreased quality of life for older men. Surgery is often required to control symptoms. It has been hypothesized that long-term administration of a nonamplifiable pure androgen might decrease prostate growth, thereby decreasing or delaying the need for surgical intervention. ‘

Participants: Healthy men (n = 114) older than 50 years without known prostate disease.

Intervention: Transdermal DHT (70 mg) or placebo gel daily for 2 years.

Results: Over 24 months, there was an increase in total (29% [95% CI, 23% to 34%]) and central (75% [CI, 64% to 86%]; P < 0.01) prostate volume and serum prostate-specific antigen level (15% [CI, 6% to 24%]) with time on study, but DHT had no effect (P > 0.2). Dihydrotestosterone treatment decreased spinal BMD (1.4% [CI, 0.6% to 2.3%]; P < 0.001) at 24 months but not hip BMD (P > 0.2) and increased serum aminoterminal propeptide of type I procollagen in the second year of the study compared with placebo. Dihydrotestosterone increased serum DHT levels and its metabolites (5α-androstane-3α,17β-diol and 5α-androstane-3β,17β-diol) and suppressed serum testosterone, estradiol, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone levels. Dihydrotestosterone increased hemoglobin levels (7% [CI, 5% to 9%]), serum creatinine levels (9% [CI, 5% to 11%]), and lean mass (2.4% [CI, 1.6% to 3.1%) but decreased fat mass (5.2% [CI, 2.6% to 7.7%]) (P <0.001 for all). Protocol-specific discontinuations due to DHT were asymptomatic increased hematocrit (n = 8), which resolved after stopping treatment, and increased prostate-specific antigen levels (n = 3; none with prostate cancer) in the DHT group. No serious adverse effects due to DHT occurred.

Conclusion: Dihydrotestosterone treatment for 24 months has no beneficial or adverse effect on prostate growth but causes a decrease in spinal but not hip BMD. These findings have important implications for the wider use of nonsteroidal pure androgens in older men.

Source: Long-Term Effects of Dihydrotestosterone Treatment on Prostate Growth in Healthy, Middle-Aged Men Without Prostate Disease

Note that “no serious adverse effects due to DHT occurred,” indicating that using DHT for this length of time is relatively safe.